“Protect” – a new legislative duty on businesses to take steps to mitigate terrorism risks

This morning, the Home Office published its analysis of the responses to last year’s consultation about the introduction of a new legislative duty – the Protect duty –  to assess and take steps to mitigate the risk of terrorist attacks. The duty would apply to organisations of a certain size and to operators of venue/places to which the public has access. The duty will apply to the private and public sector alike and relevant legislation should be expected in a matter of months.

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Irish legislation on e-scooters

Yesterday, the Irish Government published its Bill to reform and modernise road traffic legislation, which includes provisions to facilitate the use of e-scooters and other powered personal transporters (PPTs) and autonomous vehicles on roads in Ireland. The press release accompanying the Bill can be viewed here.

The approach to PPTs, when implemented, would move Ireland ahead of the UK in the widespread legalisation of e-scooter use. The Bill itself, the Road Traffic and Roads Bill 2021, is a technical and difficult read but its explanatory memorandum states that the Bill will effect “an amendment to the definition for a mechanically propelled vehicle to exclude PPTs from its scope and so permit the use of PPTs without imposing the registration, tax, licencing and insurance conditions associated with conventional motor vehicles.”

Our sense of the current debate on e-scooter use in the UK is that the government could be likely to move in a similar direction once the e-scooter trials end next year. Following the approach in Ireland and amending the definition of motor vehicle in the Road Traffic Act 1988 would be an obvious way of achieving that.


Written by Alistair Kinley at BLM (alistair.kinley@blmlaw.com)

The recording of our recent e-scooters webinar is now available here.

Annual work-related deaths due to accidents increase to 142. Mesothelioma deaths still exceed 2,000

On 7 July 2021 the Health & Safety Executive released provisional data on work-related deaths in England & Wales and Scotland in 2020/21. The data excludes ‘conventional’ occupational diseases as well as excluding COVID-19. Worker fatalities increased from 113 in 2019/20 to 142 in 2020/21 (a 25% increase) although HSE reports that last year “was low compared to other recent years [and] in statistical terms the number of fatalities has remained broadly level in recent years.” It is worth noting that despite this increase, Great Britain remains comfortably within the lower quartile of work-related fatality rates when compared to European countries.

In contrast, work-related fatalities involving members of the public fell from 106 to 60 in 2020/21. HSE points out that this “is statistically significantly lower than in earlier years and almost certainly reflects the lockdown restrictions in place on the British public over the course of the year.”

A separate HSE publication also released this month updates statistics and projections for mesothelioma deaths. An annual count of more than 2,300 deaths from the disease can hardly be described as positive, but HSE records that the total is 7% lower than the average over the last seven years. The total masks a notable difference between the sexes. The observed reduction of 9% in male deaths is “in-line with earlier predictions suggesting that annual mesothelioma deaths would gradually start to reduce by around year 2020.” However, the figure for female deaths (which form slightly more than a sixth of the total) remains similar to earlier years but, once again, is “in-line with earlier predictions suggesting that annual counts during the 2020s would remain at the current level before starting to decline.”

Both HSE publications can be accessed via links in the HSE’s press release of 7 July.


Alistair Kinley, Director of Policy & Government Affairs
alistair.kinley@blmlaw.com