Personal injuries abroad: where is the damage sustained and why is it important?

This question is at the heart of the Supreme Court’s decision in Four Seasons International Holdings (FSIH) v Brownlie. The fatal car accident, which gave rise to the claim, happened in Egypt but the claimant was an English resident and had incurred losses and expenses related to the incident on returning to England. She issued in England against FSIH, which was based in Canada, and thus had to apply to serve the proceedings outside the jurisdiction. Whether she would be able to do that would turn on where the damage was sustained.

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“Use of vehicle” to receive further judicial scrutiny in the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court has granted permission to appeal in R&S Pilling v UK Insurance. The claim stems from a fire, caused by Mr Holden welding has stationary car in order to rectify defects reported in a failed MoT test, which severely damaged the claimant’s building. The case turns on whether welding the car was “use” of the vehicle for the purposes of compulsory insurance (as required by section 143 of the Road Traffic Act 1988). It is difficult to predict when the Supreme Court might hear the case but the fact that it will very much keeps the debate on “use” a very live topic.

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Has the Chancellor revived the whiplash reform programme?

Yesterday’s budget marks just over two years since former Chancellor George Osborne announced, in his 2015 Autumn Statement, significant reforms to damages for whiplash claims and five-fold increase in the small claims limit for road traffic injury cases. Material released by the Treasury yesterday appears to indicate that Government expects to implement these reforms before April 2019.

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