“The Ministry of Justice pursued an overly ambitious and high risk strategy anyway”

The history of Government-led IT projects is hardly sparkling. Today’s report from the National Audit Office provides another example to add to the long ‘room for improvement’ column. The NAO examined the history and delivery of an offender tagging project and reached the conclusion that forms the title above. It also added that the Ministry’s approach was “not grounded in evidence, and failed to deliver against its vision.”

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Further clues about the discount rate?

Just after the election result in a blog dated 9 June I referred to “a much-changed form of political calculus” because of the hung Parliament. A subsequent piece suggested that the Queen’s Speech – passed in the Commons yesterday, 29 June – might offer a clue about legislation on the personal injuries discount rate. Some recent Government developments seem to connect both those comments and are explained in the body of this post.

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Does the dressed-down Queen’s Speech hide a reference to changing the discount rate?

With no coach, no robes, no Duke of Edinburgh – and no majority Government – this was a very different Queen’s Speech. Although Brexit and national security were among its critical themes in a Parliamentary session that has been extended to last for two years rather than one, three Bills directly relevant to the general insurance sector were announced.

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