Brexit: the Nike election?

The outcome of the general election has given the Conservatives a healthy majority with which, for better or worse and regardless of one’s personal politics, they can and will “Get Brexit Done”. It could be said that swathes of the electorate have given the Prime Minister a mandate direct from the sportswear giant Nike*“Just do it”.

In this sense at least, the Prime Minister has freed himself and his party from the limitations of minority government and also, perhaps, of the need to accommodate Brexiter ‘ultras’ in his own party. There is perhaps some irony that the price of the Conservative and Unionist Party achieving this is a significant electoral shift away from unionism (with a small u) in both Scotland and Northern Ireland.

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Civil justice and the new government

By any measure the outcome of yesterday’s election was a significant point in the UK’s politics. The returning of the Conservative government with a chunky majority means, first and foremost, that the UK will leave the EU in a little over six weeks, on 31 January 2020. In advance of a new Queen’s Speech, likely to be next week, are there already indications of what policies to expect from the new administration in the area of civil justice?

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Jurisdiction in accident abroad: further developments in Brownlie v Four Seasons

The latest decision in the very-long running Brownlie fatal accident litigation was given on 1 October 2019.

The current phase of the case turns on the question of jurisdiction when UK residents are injured outside the EU, since the relevant EU regulation – Brussels 1 (recast) – does not apply. The case is of particular interest because the relevant government guidance confirms that Brussels 1 will be repealed on EU exit day and replaced by the (English) common law and statutory provisions on jurisdiction which currently apply to cases such as Brownlie.

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