Brexit: the Nike election?

The outcome of the general election has given the Conservatives a healthy majority with which, for better or worse and regardless of one’s personal politics, they can and will “Get Brexit Done”. It could be said that swathes of the electorate have given the Prime Minister a mandate direct from the sportswear giant Nike*“Just do it”.

In this sense at least, the Prime Minister has freed himself and his party from the limitations of minority government and also, perhaps, of the need to accommodate Brexiter ‘ultras’ in his own party. There is perhaps some irony that the price of the Conservative and Unionist Party achieving this is a significant electoral shift away from unionism (with a small u) in both Scotland and Northern Ireland.

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Civil justice and the new government

By any measure the outcome of yesterday’s election was a significant point in the UK’s politics. The returning of the Conservative government with a chunky majority means, first and foremost, that the UK will leave the EU in a little over six weeks, on 31 January 2020. In advance of a new Queen’s Speech, likely to be next week, are there already indications of what policies to expect from the new administration in the area of civil justice?

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Squaring the political pyramid?

The 2017 general election changed the political shape of the House of Commons. Mathematically, the number of 650 MPs equals that of a square pyramid (144+121+100+81+64+49+36+25+16+9+4+1); although it might be said that the hung Parliament that the election has produced is not necessarily as robust as its arithmetical analogue.

At 328, the sum of Conservative (318) and DUP (10) seats would be sufficient to govern and this seems to be where matters are headed. What might these developments mean for insurance-related measures which had been shelved or side-lined pending the election?

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